Anna Bernasek: “The Typical Household, Now Worth a Third Less” – NY Times

Posted on :Jul 26, 2014

By: Anna Bernasek

NY Times

July 26, 2014

Facts are a stubborn thing and they always seem to hang around. Despite outright lies from Washington and its partner the Federal Reserve, working class income continues to be decimated. The “American Dream” has long been the American nightmare for millions of families. There was a time in the U.S. that we worked harder to gain more and give a better life to our children. Today we work harder just to maintain what little we do have. When governments and banking systems are run by tyrants the end result is always slavery existing in many different forms. – Gold Goliath

Economic inequality in the United States has been receiving a lot of attention. But it’s not merely an issue of the rich getting richer. The typical American household has been getting poorer, too.

The inflation-adjusted net worth for the typical household was $87,992 in 2003. Ten years later, it was only $56,335, or a 36 percent decline, according to a study financed by the Russell Sage Foundation. Those are the figures for a household at the median point in the wealth distribution — the level at which there are an equal number of households whose worth is higher and lower. But during the same period, the net worth of wealthy households increased substantially.

The Russell Sage study also examined net worth at the 95th percentile. (For households at that level, 94 percent of the population had less wealth and 4 percent had more.) It found that for this well-do-do slice of the population, household net worth increased 14 percent over the same 10 years. Other research, by economists like Edward Wolff at New York University, has shown even greater gains in wealth for the richest 1 percent of households.

For households at the median level of net worth, much of the damage has occurred since the start of the last recession in 2007. Until then, net worth had been rising for the typical household, although at a slower pace than for households in higher wealth brackets. But much of the gain for many typical households came from the rising value of their homes. Exclude that housing wealth and the picture is worse: Median net worth began to decline even earlier.

“The housing bubble basically hid a trend of declining financial wealth at the median that began in 2001,” said Fabian T. Pfeffer, the University of Michigan professor who is lead author of the Russell Sage Foundation study.

The reasons for these declines are complex and controversial, but one point seems clear: When only a few people are winning and more than half the population is losing, surely something is amiss.

Gold Goliath is not your typical gold dealer.

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