“BRICS Announce $100 Billion Reserve To Bypass Fed, Developed World Central Banks” – Zero Hedge

Posted on :Jul 15, 2014

By: Tyler Durden

Zero Hedge

July 15, 2014

As we suggested last night, the anti-dollar alliance among the BRICS has successfully created a so-called “mini-IMF.” As Putin explains, this is part of “a system of measures that would help prevent the harassment of countries that do not agree with some foreign policy decisions made by the United States and their allies.” Initial capital for the BRICS Bank will be $50 Billion – paid in equal share among the 5 members (with a contingent reserve up to $100 Billion) and will see India as the first President. The BRICS Bank will be based in Shanghai and chaired by Russia. Simply put, as Sovereign Man’s Simon Black warns, “when you see this happen, you’ll know it’s game over for the dollar…. I give it 2-3 years.”

  • *BRICS MINISTERS SIGN DEVELOPMENT BANK AGREEMENT
  • *INITIAL SUBSCRIBED CAPITAL OF BRICS BANK IS $50 BLN: STATEMENT
  • *BRICS BANK CAPITAL EQUALLY SHARED BY MEMBERS: STATEMENT
  • *BRICS CONTINGENT RESERVE ACCORD AMOUNTS TO $100 BLN: STATEMENT

As BRICS push ahead…

  • *EMERGING MARKETS HELP GLOBAL GROWTH SIGNIFICANTLY: STATEMENT
  • *ROUSSEFF: MAIN WORLD INSTITUTIONS ARE LESS REPRESENTATIVE
  • *ROUSSEFF: URGENT TO REFORM U.N. SECURITY COUNCIL
  • *BRICS DISAPPOINTED WITH LACK OF IMF REFORM IMPLEMENTATION

And a jab at The Fed:

  • *MONETARY POLICY MUST BE CAREFULLY CALIBRATED: BRICS STATEMENT

Excerpts from the Full statement to follow:

11. BRICS, as well as other EMDCs, continue to face significant financing constraints to address infrastructure gaps and sustainable development needs. With this in mind, we are pleased to announce the signing of the Agreement establishing the New Development Bank (NDB), with the purpose of mobilizing resources for infrastructure and sustainable development projects in BRICS and other emerging and developing economies. We appreciate the work undertaken by our Finance Ministers. Based on sound banking principles, the NDB will strengthen the cooperation among our countries and will supplement the efforts of multilateral and regional financial institutions for global development, thus contributing to our collective commitments for achieving the goal of strong, sustainable and balanced growth.

12. The Bank shall have an initial authorized capital of US$ 100 billion. The initial subscribed capital shall be of US$ 50 billion, equally shared among founding members. The first chair of the Board of Governors shall be from Russia. The first chair of the Board of Directors shall be from Brazil. The first President of the Bank shall be from India. The headquarters of the Bank shall be located in Shanghai. The New Development Bank Africa Regional Center shall be established in South Africa concurrently with the headquarters. We direct our Finance Ministers to work out the modalities for its operationalization.

13. We are pleased to announce the signing of the Treaty for the establishment of the BRICS Contingent Reserve Arrangement (CRA) with an initial size of US$ 100 billion. This arrangement will have a positive precautionary effect, help countries forestall short-term liquidity pressures, promote further BRICS cooperation, strengthen the global financial safety net and complement existing international arrangements. We appreciate the work undertaken by our Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors. The Agreement is a framework for the provision of liquidity through currency swaps in response to actual or potential short-term balance of payments pressures.

18. We remain disappointed and seriously concerned with the current non-implementation of the 2010 International Monetary Fund (IMF) reforms, which negatively impacts on the IMF’s legitimacy, credibility and effectiveness. The IMF reform process is based on high-level commitments, which already strengthened the Fund’s resources and must also lead to the modernization of its governance structure so as to better reflect the increasing weight of EMDCs in the world economy. The Fund must remain a quota-based institution. We call on the membership of the IMF to find ways to implement the 14th General Review of Quotas without further delay. We reiterate our call on the IMF to develop options to move ahead with its reform process, with a view to ensuring increased voice and representation of EMDCs, in case the 2010 reforms are not entered into force by the end of the year. We also call on the membership of the IMF to reach a final agreement on a new quota formula together with the 15th General Review of Quotas so as not to further jeopardize the postponed deadline of January 2015. 

So that’s it – there is an alternate non-US dominated provider of credit in the world…

We leave it to Sovereign Man’s Simon Black to add his colorful view on the endgame here…

Exactly 70 years ago to the day, hundreds of delegates from 44 nations were busy at work in Bretton Woods, New Hampshire creating a brand new financial system.

World War II had just ended. Europe was in ruin.

And since the US was simultaneously the largest economy in the world, the primary victor in the war, and the only major power with its productive capacity intact, it was easy to dictate terms: the dollar would dominate the new system.

Every nation would hold dollars as the primary reserve currency, and the dollar would be redeemable for gold at $35/ounce.

Also, global commerce would be conducted and settled in dollars, and these settlements would clear through the US banking system.

Naturally this created substantial demand from foreign governments who needed to begin accumulating dollars for trade and reserves.

So through a variety of programs, from the Marshall Plan to the IMF and World Bank, the US began flooding the world with dollars.

Initially everything went according to plan.

But soon the US government realized something important– foreign demand for the dollar was so strong that they could get away with printing more dollars than they had gold.

This allowed them to run all sorts of deficits and spending initiatives– more war, more welfare, more waste… all with minimal accountability.

Initially the consequences were insignificant.

Sure, the price of gold in London was a few dollars higher than in the US (they called this the ‘gold window’).

But demand for the dollar was still strong. So why bother changing?

By 1971, the situation had gotten far worse. Another decade of war, excessive spending, trade deficits, and money printing had pushed many foreign nations to their breaking points.

Foreign nations’ dollar reserves far exceeded the US government’s gold holdings. And with confidence waning, many began redeeming their dollars for gold.

Only days later, Richard Nixon put a stop to this and unilaterally terminated the US dollar’s convertibility to gold.

Think about the magnitude of this decision: Nixon was effectively defaulting on US obligations to the rest of the world– a complete betrayal of their trust.

Yet despite this massive shock that reset the global financial system, the dollar somehow managed to remain the world’s #1 reserve currency.

You’d think they would have been grateful, thanking their lucky stars that the rest of the world gave them a second chance. But no.

Over the past 43 years, the US has continued to print, devalue, and mismanage the dollar.

Along the way, they’ve created epic bubbles and financial shocks.

They’ve run up the biggest deficits and debt levels ever seen in the history of the world.

They’ve bickered internally to the point of shutting down government.

They’ve passed arrogant, painful regulations and commanded the rest of the world to comply under threats tantamount to financial homicide.

They’ve unleashed their tax and securities authorities to terrorize anyone doing business with the US.

They’ve totally ignored foreign pleas to restructure the IMF and World Bank.

They’ve slammed foreign banks with record fines simply for doing business with nations that the US doesn’t like.

They’ve waged pointless wars. They’ve spied on their allies. They’ve meddled in other nations’ affairs.

And they’ve demonstrated absolutely no willingness or ability to improve.

Simply put, other nations are done. Fed up, really. And it’s not just words.

Consider that in a matter of months, the US will be overtaken by China as the world’s largest economy.

Not to mention, the total combined GDPs of China, India, Russia, and Brazil are roughly the same as the US and EU combined.

Just as the US was the biggest player back in 1944, China is the biggest player today. So it seems clear that the renminbi will become a critical component of a new financial system.

The renminbi already has experienced rapid growth as a dollar alternative for trade; in May, cross-border settlement surged 52% from the year prior.

Renminbi settlement banks are being set up from London to Canada, and the central banks of both France and Luxembourg have signed agreements for renminbi clearing.

There have already been numerous Western companies (like McDonalds) that have issued renminbi-denominated bonds.

And even the provincial government of British Colombia issued a renminbi bond earlier this year. It was a whopping five times oversubscribed.

I’d expect within the next 2-3 years we’ll start seeing trade settlement in renminbi, even when none of the parties are in China.

Today, for example, a transaction between a Paraguayan merchant and a company in Angola will likely settle in US dollars.

Soon, I think we’ll start seeing that transaction done in renminbi. And once that happens, you’ll know it’s game over for the dollar.

Shortly after, national governments in western countries will issue renminbi bonds (perhaps Greece or Portugal will be first). And eventually, even the US government itself.

Today, 70 years after Bretton Woods, leaders from China, Russia, India, Brazil, South Africa, and several other nations are hard at work in Fortaleza, Brazil creating a new development bank that will compete against the US-controlled World Bank.

This is a major step in an obvious trend towards a new financial system. Every shred of objective data is SCREAMING for this to happen.

It’s a different world. Everyone realizes it except for the US government, which is still living in the past where they’re #1 and get to call all the shots.

The consequences of missing this boat are enormous, and it’s going to be a rude awakening for anyone not paying attention.

Gold Goliath is not your typical gold dealer.

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